About your Search

20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> i am the director of community affairs. it is a great pleasure to introduce mr. john martin. >> thank you all for being here. [applause] thank you for being here for the opening of the marine response emergency facility. i want to begin by introducing several dignitaries. the first is commission vice president mike hardeman. thank you. and commissioner steve nakaja. and i want to introduce our police department deputy chief at the airport, the guy in charge. david chen is here. from the adjacent coast guard facility, the commander. and we have staff members from our congressional delegation. we have staff members from senator feinstein's office, nancy pelosi's office, and others. thank you for joining us today. [applause] throughout our history, safety and security has always been our priority. safety and security of our passengers, and safety of our employees. we are building on that commitment by commissioning what is the first fire rescue boat house facility on the west coast of the united states. more simply -- [airplane noise] we are at an airport. this is the first mar
fleming and john miller. >> now, all along the parade route this song that echoed through the ballpark and my broadcast partner on the radio dave fleming somehow has involuntary reaction to it. a lot of people think he's so into it. whenever the music comes on he can't contain himself. it's not even that and i'm going to show you it right now. >> i'm not sure where you're going with this john. >> it's uncontrollable for him so he's not really into even the thought of it but i want to show you what really happens. we seen him do it so many times in the ballpark. along the parade route they were pleading for him to do it. >> i don't know. >> so really -- now keep your eyes on dave. watch what happens when i say "oh gangom style". >> john, can do it with me too. >> okay, okay. i can't help it. [cheers and applause] now, another thing that occurred to us was that giants winning on the road the way they did, the one thing the giants' players really missed was that ability to share it with all of you, and we thought because they're right in the back here we could give them that feelin
cousin john edwards volunteered for possession every week. he was certified. ex exor citizenim did nothing. colt 45, crazy horse they demand the sacrifices in blood so bottles would go to the couch friday night. walls kicked until straight jackets lay waiting on the lawn. mama would site visions of gang boys with metal vent as if it explained anything. it didn't between dusk from the and dawn saturday he was ready to blow the -- up. do you want some of this? oh , no, yes oh , noy ll goes off the page's edge. he smiles. he's surprised to hear when his mouth opens. that's mine. so, this really lovely book that georgia put together for me has great painting on the cover. a painting of mcintosh street in georgia painted in the 1940's by a man, frank stanley herring. i saw this painting after i had written this next poem and after i talked to my grand mother and she mentioned this street to me. i didn't know it existed because by the time i was coming up the black business district was gone. and the past few years i think they erected a monument to it. nigger street. 1937. mcintosh stre
is john newlin, president of the entertainment commission. i, however, and not john newlin. i have more hair than john newlin. but i am vice chair of the commission. permit compliance is up. the violence is down. a variety of entertainment is what makes our city great. we will touch on the upcoming party legislation -- party bus legislation and a safe place for our youth to go. after our panel discussion will have some regard groups so we can share ideas and brainstorm. we have a very luminary panel here. right now, i would like to introduce our cheap -- chief of police. [applause] >> good afternoon. i also am not john newlin, and i have less hair than him. [laughter] is a pleasure to be here for the second year. there are fewer people here. that might be because it has been a good year. as audrey suggests i believe that is because of partnership is up. we want to be a police department that you are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible.
politically. he allowed john burton to talk him into running for the state legislature. an unsuccessful effort for the state assembly. he went on to become, obviously, a supervisor in the city and county of san francisco. and in those days it was a different city. it was dramatically different. there was no such thing as a so-called progressive, david campos. there was no such thing as somebody in that category. george moscone, philip burton, represented that which we all now richly enjoy. george went on to become a state senator. and in that capacity, scott, it was george moscone who shepherded the bill that removed criminal penalties between consenting adults in this state that cost people their positions as teachers, as doctors, as nurses, as lawyers in those days. it was a bill that we orchestrated together. and george did what has never been done since, and that is cause the senate to hookup in a 20 to 20 tie in the late dimely was flown in from colorado to break the tie to give us that bill. that set the stage, scott, for all the things that have occurred in this state, and ultimately in
up the fact once again we have the amazing st. john event doing our food in the north light court. so, at the conclusion of this evening's event we ask you all join us in the north light court to enjoy a wonderful selection of food and wine and drinks. i'd also like to take a moment, of course, and thank mayor lee for once again extending the invitation to host the event here as well at city hall as well as our new city administrator naomi kelly who will be making remarks here promptly in a little bit. and thank them for their generous hospitality not only 230er this event but for this program because without their leadership and support the neighborhood department network would not exist. i'd also like to thank the folks at the city hall events team who every year make this event come together and make it a success. in addition, i'd like to also thank our sponsors. * once again, pg&e the fifth year in a row stepped up and become a major sponsor here for the neighborhood empowerment network. we have two new event sponsors this year. we have next door, which is a new online program her
, from john mere pierre from the meat store and pierre was front and center when that fire happened on walgreens on fillmore and haight and getting those people out. thea shelby who has been working really hard, one of the founders of the lower haight merchant and neighborhood associations. she has been a tireless advocate in this area for public safety. i'm so happy to see you here. devon, the new president and thea has served as the president for the past two years, and devon is now taking over as the new president. and wing-wings, wing-wings, one of my favorite places. lisa is here from wing-wings, and dick, one of my favorite people from the lower haight, i am so happy to see you all here. i wanted to just come and congratulate. is there someone else here? oh, robert, hi, sweety. he's always there for you. he's amazing guy. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm just here as the supervisor, my first event to honor you, to support you, to thank you for not just being in the neighborhood, but really opening up your doors and caring about the neighborhood. caring about what
and worked with us. john stewart, john is right here being led with his development team. we have howard here as well. you have the ridge point, which is i think the most mature of the housing managers here, ridge point's been around since '68, right? >> that's right. >> and all of you amassed together with the mayor's office of housing with hope sf, with the housing authority to make sure this dream comes alive. and, so, i'm just here today to say this is just the first of many announcements. we've got three phases just at hunters view. now, hunters view was seen only as a pilot project. and if you see the smiles on this family's faces and the other 25, it's working. this pilot project is working. it's working not just because of the physical rebuild, but the care that hope sf has is about the lives and improvements of those lives. we had residents of hunters view involved in every stage of this project, looking for job training, looking to be part of this, looking to help move in and being part of the establishment. and, so, they weren't just going to be sitting back, receiving the benefits
with you in all the years to come. >> thank you. >> thank you. (applause) >> john said almost everything i wanted to say. but i do want to thank specifically mohammed nuru because he's been incredible. his toehold, everyone. francis and john avalos' office, without her nobody would know what we were doing because she helps us with all of our fliers and everything that we need to do. john has been tireless. he comes to my house on fridays at 5:30 for meetings. he's a great, great supervisor and a champion for our district. and we're excited about this year. we're going to put in a park. we're going to do safety initiatives. we're looking for grant money for more beautification. if anybody is interested in starting a neighborhood watch and getting involved, call me and i can help you get started. it's a great thing to know your neighbors, even the ones who are a pain in the neck. it's a great thing to know your neighbors. [laughter] (applause) >> i would just like to say thank you to all of our neighbors because we have lived in that neighborhood for 37 years and it's just been such a joy to
this because of the letter from john over and over link. and i'm personally not ready to endorse a project i haven't seen approved >> i want to follow up with a question you're saying there's a projected surplus. thank you mr. mann tin. that is a reasonable case that it might be brought in what happens if it doesn't? >> so at a time we are seeing just over $3 million of a revenue surplus based on the current monies for the year. we would experience a $3 million surplus and it's reasonable >> so what we're asking for is 3 million not a projected 6 and. >> that's correct. >> that's correct once the money does come in we're going to make sure the money is identified for the appropriate project. >> i do have questions about the central corridor in light of the fact that theirs not enough information and i'd like to have an asterisk on that particular line item. >> two thoughts on that i appreciate those comments. i did spend some time with john and what we haven't determined yet is some of the range of alternatives and we're going to look at those alternatives. one way to allow us to go a
, sometimes mouthing the words, sometimes singing them quietly, moves towards john without looking, for he cannot look at his son. and he touches john's heart and then he moves away towards the city hall of john's memory and john set the stairs in the way that george did, cocky and sexy, cruel as all get out. and then the song ends. and i notice the woman sitting next to me crying. and after the play is over, after the standing ovation of tony's brave and beautiful play, as people start to leave the theater, this woman, she remains in her chair and it seems she cannot move. i gently asked her if she's all right. and she nods. and she says without looking at me because she couldn't look at me, "i got to see my mayor again." so, maybe through art we can see again. about a month ago i braved going to the sf moment to check out the infamous bust of my dad and all i could remember growing up were the images of that controversial pedestal of gunshots and twinkies and don't think i didn't smile when i heard hostess went under. [laughter] (applause) but when i went to see the bust for that first t
into the congressional record our testimony honoring the life of ambassador john christopher stevens. in the interest of time i won't read the entire congressional record but only an excerpt. it said mr. speaker, i rise with my colleagues to honor, celebrate and remember ambassador john christopher chris stevens. a son of northern california and the bay area, ambassador stevens tragically lost his life in the greatest service to his country. selflessly and courageously representing american values in a foreign nation he knew intimately and cared for deeply. in his diplomatic
world series was john mcgraw in 1921, but don't let bochy fool you with his seemingly easy going nature. the wheels are always turning with him and we can say there is no finer manager in the game today. [cheers and applause] i want to acknowledge the foundation of the giants organization, our ownership group, 32 strong lead by charles johnson. they stepped up to serve as a stalt walt of this franchise and saved it in 1976 and then brought it to san francisco in the first place in 1958. i am proud each owner during the 55 years in san francisco is represented here today. as a fourth generation san franciscan growing up in the richmond district my heroes did wear orange and black. i watched them with my dad and mays and the other players. they're all here today. i knew their story as well as i knew my own because their stories were mine. they were part of my heritage. my parents passed it down to him just as brandon crawford's parents passed it to him and you're passing it your children and pam and i are passing it our children. all my heroes still wear orange and black. there
, skyscrapers and everything. this is a poem that reimagines that gentlemen exists the bus in that skit as john henry. this is a section of it. skyscrapers and everything. j hammer henry mallet [inaudible] could barely fit hammer poking out like natural man's skyscraper to the concrete for deep machine sleep abouts income. don't go john henry traffic man, don't go across that street. the flood song poems were poems written in reaction to katrina. how can i enter that space of writing poems about that. i'm not from there and don't have family there. who benefits from that tragedy? who benefits from that disregard for humanity and the thought animals would benefit from that. this first poem is flood songs number 4 mosquitoes drinking didy. >> drink every hour next up this hour and every hour after. was born in the river there is enough to go around. drink every hour on the hour and every hour after. in the river there is enough to go around. drink every hour. there is enough to go around. drink every hour and every hour after. go to the river there is enough to go around. drink up the hours and
have commented since on chris's salient commitment to the people of benghazi. john thorn writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been f
to where we are today. want to reiterate the development team, john stewart, [speaker not understood], thank you. you've had a big part of this. and enterprise community. nancy pelosi's office and staff, they've been with us lockstepfighting for dollars. our pd, our fire, our first responders, our friends and also many that work at hud, staff, residents like coordinators, the list can go on and on because we definitely need to acknowledge these, that this is a multi-, multilevel approach. i also want to pay my respects to former supervisor sophie maxwell who also had the vision and leadership to get this project started forward. also had the foresight to tear down that power plant that was polluting our community. so, we really are where -- we are today is a culmination of small, little incremental steps that we have been taking for the last 40 years. 40 years is a long time, but now we need to think about the future and going forward and take pride and protect our investment, protect our children, shop locally, the businesses and restaurants that are happening and coming in on 3rd s
honor and celebrate ambassador john christopher stevens in this civic celebration of his life. i thank the stevens family for hosting this celebration here. amongst his many friends, his family, his colleagues from around the world who continue to reremember and celebrate his distinguished life and sacrifice he made for all of us. while we have lost a true hero to our nation, his accomplishments and generosity lives on in all the places he that served, promoting mutual respect and cooperation in international relationships. ambassador stevens is an inspiration to all of us. i did something personally. i texted my daughters who also grew up in the bay area. they have always reminded me that they love being san franciscans. now as young adults they pride themselves in being world citizens. this is that place. san francisco and the bay area, where we have our attitudes and evolve ourselves to be not only great san francisco and bay area citizens but the inter national status of our city and bay area promote us to be world citizens. i'm pride to be mayor of a city that embraces peace, dive
by their education that wanted to make them as a john wayne, you know? apparently. it was very sensitive in reality. you have to be sensitive anyway. but to look real mature like that. so i wanted to show the first collection i did. for me, it was evident. the male object. i always felt, not consulted because i do not consider myself as a woman, but i felt insulted for the woman to say, you know, there was that expression for the woman. [speaking foreign language] she had a lot to say, a very modern woman. i say, is that completely stupid? maybe she is beautiful. so i say that the men i show will be balanced. i do not say that is the only object, not at all. unless maybe. but i want to show that community and men. and i wanted to show the masculinity in the woman. >> humans and in passing just now farida kelfer, the was the beginning of the showing on the runway, models who were not typical of the models at the time. i am sorry to say that is this still true that we see so little diversity on the runways. it is really shameful. you have always thought their direct there are -- showing that there is
association, i have an opportunity to choose the theme for our law day, and i chose the legacy of john adams from concord to guantanamo, because every high-school student had to think about why it is our obligation to defend those who have ideas different than our own. why we live in a constitutional democracy. a constitutional democracy is the difference of two words, each of which are two letters. that is the rule "of" law, and the rule "by" law. the rule by law as when a majority get together and get -- and decide what rights, if any, the minority has. nazi germany was one of the most lawful and unjust society is in the history of the world. the nuremberg laws were rules by law. what exists around most of the world and in cuba today come in my own experience, is that the most powerful, the most privileged, get together and decide what rights, if any, the minority have. the united states constitution is the rule by law. the rule by law is to protect the minority from the tyranny of the majority. it is the classic definition of law. now, the rule of law is what justice kennedy and justice r
the mayor totally committed to redeveloping public housing with the residents. we have developers like john stewart, divine and gong ridgeview who have sweat blood for years for this project. they should be incredibly proud of what they've done. lord knows they won't make much money at it. [laughter] >> we have, we have a board of supervisors supporting this for years. we have philanthropy i, we have corporations, we have hud, we have a whole range of people that are committed to this for the long term. * so, i just want to say this is one step. and there are many steps to go, but this is monumental. and congratulations to the residents and everyone involved in the project. thank you. (applause) >> so, at this time i'd like to sort of close the ceremony or presentation by thanking all those people that i didn't thank and didn't acknowledge who should have been acknowledged because there's just too many people to acknowledge. i know we have some commissioners here, both from the former redevelopment commission and the housing authority commission and some of the other commissions. there are
across this district. thank you. >> hi, i have a son at john colonel, and i want to talk about community briefing. pac begins ongoing (inaudible) to bring s
to emphasize the work of the department. john arnston and his team have tremendous resources. the guy runs a great shop. it's a machine. and he improves the process every time. he does postpomortum and tries figure out what we can do and to figure out the outreach. my term has expired on january 1, i am in the hold-over phase and that expires on march 1. >> in march 1 we have the opportunity to ask you to stay on? >> correct, i would be honored if that is possible. >> we will talk about that. commissioner maufas. >> thank you, and i apologize that i wasn't here, catalina, but i was listening in the back. and i want to comment on what commissioner wynns said, we haven't had a report like this, and you set the standard. were you able to share this with your other colleagues? >> yes, and i attached the annual report at the time president matthews put together. current president, gleason hasn't been able to put together an annual report. but this is a report and my help in department. >> again, it's great. and it's so thorough and helpful for us to understand. usually we put someone in this sp
, mississippi john hurt me, sonny terry brown mcgee, i played some blues harmonica. >> did you learn that open tuning style, slide style? >> i have not picked up a slide in a long time, so i do not want to embarrass myself, but yes. it was a lot of folk music, blues and early on. i fell in love with the sound of the steel string guitar. there are a lot of idiomatic thing that it does well. i studied classic guitar a bit, but the steel string, for example, we do something called a hammer on and pull off, which is -- >> you get three note for the price of one. >> you plug the string but you get four notes. i always think of that town at the the prototypical steel string guitar sound. british isles, a caltech music. i learned all the paul simon songs. as i got older -- >> he is a hell of a guitarist. people do not realize. he is not flashy, but if you try to learn his tunes, they are really hard. >> he is a brilliant guitar player. i eventually got interested in jazz, world music, everything. maybe that is one of the reasons. i enjoyed so many kinds of music, i did not have a preference. i did no
. >> there is that famous story where a music ecologist told john lennon that he ended a song in an alien cadence, and he says, i did? this program is provided by the commonwealth club in forum. tonight we are presenting music. i am here with alex degrassi, a grammy award winning guitarist. we will continue with audience questions. >> you mentioned in your book, and right now, music has a pulse. i wonder what you think or know happens in the brain when music is disjointed, bad. how about classical music? >> one of the things -- whether you know it or not, whether you are a musician or not -- your brain is trying to predict what is or to come next, just like in speech. if i was going to say, the pizza was too hot to sleep, your brain is surprised because it had a prediction of what was going to come. a skillful physician will break it up harmonically, totally, or rhythmically, and when it becomes hard to predict, it becomes a game. what is your feeling about that? you do a lot of rhythmic changes. >> one of the things that i do a fair amount of -- maybe the question is asking, for example -- you have a pi
holidays to you all. this is san francisco's official holiday tree right behind us, uncle john's tree and over 100 years old, and tonight it sports over 550 christmas holiday lights. >> five, four, three, two, one! >> yay!
receives a visit from john nitto. he returns to the faces above the steaming plates before he's out into the neon lit street leaving behind a trail of rose petals bark as sacrificial hearts. thank you. [applause]. >> whenever i had writer's block i do research so i thought i would redo a section which started as writer's block and it took place in a library. i think all you need to know is my narrater is 19. the object of affection is 21. max's mother is a piannist and also polish. >> i saw little of rose after she moved her 2 valises into the nurses room on valentine's day of 1939. she did not allow a gust to drive her to the louve. she did not pause to look at me when i went to the gallery wearing a new shirt. nor did she take meals to my families. sometimes this was the best. at the dinner table my parents argued. father had been unsuccessful in keeping the newspapers from others. she practiced less and less. germany is not poland said my father. there are no contacts in berlin. >> he's a crazy man when i hear him on the radio. i can barely understand the german he's speaking
dr. barney horner, who is the great grandson of chief john grass from standing rock reservation in south dakota. one of the songs he gave me before he passed on, on indigenous people's day in 1995, was a song that he called the blue horse special. the blue horse special is the song that i have been fortunate enough to be able to play in a lot of different performance contexts. it's a song that was made by a man named matthew too bold, a very well respected elder whose wife, ellie, just recently passed on. both of them were very well respected for their singing skills. when i thought about doing an arrangement for today, the blue horse special came to mind. i thought i wonder if i can bring a cedar flute into an air, i thought, i wonder if i can take a pala song and turn it into a reel. what i will do is sing you the original pala song, so you can hear that, then we will go into an arrangement that also includes a little something at the end for my grandparents. (singing)
john fung head this up and behalf of the board and all of us and thank you mr. secretary. mr. administrator. senator feinstein, leader pelosi, congress woman spear and mayor lee and thank you all for being here and now it's time to make it official. it's sign that document. okay. [applause] >> thank you tom. and as we're getting ready to sign this grand slam document let me make sure we give a great appreciation to our county transportation authority who has been administering the funds for this great project and a great shout out to the union square improvement district. i know there are businesses big and small that will suffer a little bit from the construction but they're going to be patient. they know the result of this is a great future for our great city and thank you to all of the businesses and we will be communicating with them all the time with all of the agencies. decades now ladies and gentlemen city residents and our city will know the vision started 20 years ago to today we built a great transportation system we're going to be proud of and this is part of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)